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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 188 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the history of this extraordinary religion. all the other major world religions can pinpoint a particular time or perhaps a particular leader. but you go into the primordial early years of hinduism and it's very vague, very old, very mystical, how it all began. and in fact, the swami will say that hinduism really isn't a historical religion at all - it's about an eternal truth. so if we could turn to the swami, let's hear in his own words what hinduism is in terms of history, but also in terms of some of its key teachings. >> see, hinduism, we can divide the history into three heads - one of them ancient, one of them medieval, and then the modern. and in one sentence, the history, when we say, it's all about the past. hinduism really is called sanatana dharma, or the eternal religion, because it deals with the eternal values - not just the past values or the present values - and the eternal truth. so it is not a historical religion, like christianity or buddhism or islam, where someone founded on a particular date and then afterwards it went in growing. the eternal interlinks - spirit, or the
for religion and edge ikz news weekly is brute to you by a family foundation dedicated to its founders' interest in religion, community development and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized, individl and group retirement products. that's why we're retirement company. and the corporation for public broadcasting. >> welcome. i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. pope benedict xvi stunned the world this week with the surprise announcement that he's decided to resign, the first pope to step down in 600 years. our coverage today includes analysis from two experts on the church, and it begins with reacti from catholics and non-catholics alie, gathered by our managing editor kim lawton. >> benedict said he's resigning "for the good of the church." >> isn't that a profound sign of his own humility in that he was able to recognize when, you know, it just was more than he could handle? and instead of letting just sort of others do the job, he viewed very strongly that we needed somebody in that position that would really be able to tak
religions to help them schedule exams and other student activities. it includes things like chinese new year and mainstream holidays like christmas, hanukkah and channing-tatum's birthday. while not taken seriously the school hasn't received complaints about it and many have found it, quote, useful and informational. we track down a typical wiccan ceremony. >> we are getting letters from wiccans now. is this a big deal or a huge deal? >> i am totally in favor of this. we have all admitted that college is a waste of time. it costs a lot of money, and you are there and learning 3w* sexual liberation and canadian fiction, and you are bankrupting yourself doing it. you may get more from lighting candles. it may be more beneficial in the long run. >>> immogen, the american identification survey showed roughly 700,000 americans say they are wiccan or neo pagan. why not include their holidays in a guide? >> that and let's face it. a lot of these holidays were matched up to holidays that already exist. christianity took their holidays from pagan sigh m -- pay begannism. that's how it began. easter c
, a cardinal in the roman catholic faith is someone you would say immediately is the belief style of religion, but you're so right, susanna, that all the styles were embodied in that man, and he was certainly a seeker. in fact, i had a wonderful conversation with martin marty, who that he had a chance to meet the great religious people of the world - the dalai lama, the pope, other great religious leaders - and he said that every one, they go so deeply into their own tradition, that they can find connection with other traditions. and our swami that we'll meet in the next class is exactly like that also, because he sees all religious paths as leading to a similar summit. not everybody agrees with that, yeah, you want to follow-up, susanna? >> well, i was just going to say, truly, you may have hit on it, that the deeper you go, the more you recognize. and his roots were down, and you could see there were other ones there, sort of mixing in with yours, but there is a connection. >> i love the root comment, and we want to stay with the root comment here in your beautiful piece you read to us. and
to dianetics then he invented the religion scientology. what is it exactly? there is a lot to know about of very eccentric world view and there are many elements in scientology that soundalike science fiction because there were written by someone gave britain something similar. that you are an immortal soul. in you have lived before and you will live again scientology helps you to remember the past lifetime it is good news to a lot of people. it is called auditing. the auditor between you and your auditor there is a divide called the of e-meter would hold toucans they used to be campbell's soup there is a wire and a small, not of electricity passing through it is one-third of all lie detector the measure is your skin responses not pulsar restoration but it does do something. when you're talking to your auditor the needle is constantly registering. in scientology they think it measures the mass of your thoughts and you can see the movement with the old the painful memory to show up and if you go through this thought and traded of painful qualities then the nato will slow down and pretty s
on whether the courts agree with them. but they actually are trying to establish religion in the present system is actually picking one religion over another, they are helping to make it so that these are the real religions and they are picking the winners and losers essentially. neil: you are not afraid that they are witches? you are going to go right down the food chain? >> it is a long shot. >> they have enough of the case to go back to the district courts to have the opportunity of the case being presented. if they can show that this wasn't done in a neutral way, that this was done and they are just preferring the catholics over the weekends, then we needo address that. >> i think that all religions need to be treated equally. especially where people are looking for a source of religion. stability. most people in a country were placed where we are the most incarcerated place in the world, they should have the opportunity to do so. remember, a terrorist was recruited to become a muslim terrorist imprisoned. and that is a huge problem. i think that our justice department needs to look
in extreme poverty. their lives governed by religion and caste. many women never even report an assault, due to the social stigma. we are looking for the woman that the minister is accused of raping. "how do i know" says a neighbor. against a wall of silence. they seem almost too scared to tell us where she is. one person asks who will save them if they go against the establishment. >> these charges. an attempt to murder. >> this man says he tried to go against the establishment. he accused his local minister of trying to kill him after he challenged him in an election. he says this shows this. >> i am a conman. he was a politician. the police never would have had a case against him. >> but there has been no movement in the case so far, like so many in the overloaded indian justice system. we are on our way now to the minister accused of trying to kill his rival. it is not just attempted murder he is charged with, but many other crimes, too, including robbery and kidnapping. this man has won four elections here, and he has been in power 15 years. we pay him a surprise visit and five him surr
. but watch again. it's fascinating - a world away in terms of religion. we've got hinduism, for our monist mysticism, we might have heard something or will hear something from original peoples, first national peoples, native americans. now we're going through the coptic orthodox faith, and two folks in this roll-in, both equally astute. one is brother mark, who used to be, i believe, a dentist or some kind of professional field, and he gave that up in order to go to this monastery, where he lives his life, and a life of meditation and prayer and connection with god. bishop thomas, on the other hand, is a major bishop in the coptic faith in egypt, but listen particularly, because we've had barbara's beautiful sahara - once again, we're getting too many synchronicities in this class. we have this book - from the library, folks; that's why you can't see the front on it - but we have this book about the sahara - we'll, we're going to the sahara; i forgot about that. yeah, we're going back to the sahara, and listen to what life would be like there. and so, if we could, let's go to st. macarius
of religion is understood to be a completely private matter. in the statement by mendelssohn, in connection with france, he said to be a citizen in the streets but a jew at home, but that is not the message you get from the stable of kosher food in philadelphia. it is ok to be a jew in public, too. it is not a matter of expressing to the private. the spirit of freedom is perhaps unique to the united states in the world, but even here, even with that kind of sounding, and even with the words of the first amendment to express that, things have not always been so happy, and especially not always so happy for minorities in america. he was not then chief justice but the man who was going to become chief justice of the supreme court fought on the convention to exclude roman catholics. it was a big fight. he was defeated alternately, -- alternately, but that was an attempt, and it was not long after, and that was a time when catholics constituted less than 1% of the population of the united states and were no threat out all. as larger numbers of roman catholics came to these shores, especially fro
particular religion or faith, and that is this notion of a church that is growing, to your phrase, with the times. let's put that into two parts. a church that is growing, i totally get. nobody wants to be part of a church that is regressing, losing members, that is not expanding and going into different parts of the world, so i get that part. i guess what i did troubled by is this notion of a church changing with the times. if you are catholic, pentecostal, whatever you might be, you might be buddhist, how does a church have a responsibility to change with the times? if this is what you believe, and if these are the tenants of the gospel, and i use that word with the small "g," then why does the church even feel pressured to change with the times? i do not want to be in a church, quite frankly, that is changing with the times. i went to be in a church that stands for what it believes and believes what it stands for and does not change with the whims of the membership, so why would the catholic church above the other institutions that i see, at least, find itself in this conversat
parents like that. very modern. very open-minded. unlike for some, there's no question of religion, of color of skin, or anything like that. people can be all beautiful. it depends on who they are, but it is not a question of color. for me, both of us were beautiful. and i loved color. color of the skin. tattoo on the skin, which is a kind of color. some blue colors that you add. and i wanted to show that. when i started, i remember that there were some beautiful girls. they're beautiful. but i felt like, ok, but there is also beauty. i have a girlfriend which was modeling for me that i met very early when i started that was from a french colony. she was beautiful and black and very inspiring, very nice. i say, yes, why not. for me, a difference was beautiful. they looked to me, and i wanted to show it. another kind of different was the fact that when i saw farida, i said, my god, she is incredible. i was very impressed by her beauty. very frightened even by her beauty. she was kind of a very arrogant imperial. and african and beauty with a special expression. not arrogant. but bea
it clear while we don't have jurisdiction over religion in the same way we don't over sexual orientation, what we're seeing in all of these -- and all of these are case by case, you can't just broad sweep the laws -- when students are bullied and harassed in this world because of religion, in most instances a lot of that is not about race or religion, it's because. perception that students that share certain religious traits also share certain ethnicities and that is discrimination and that falls under title 6. it is not just about enforcing the laws that make it clear how the laws apply. it is, though, as we said, you can't get at this through enforcement alone. this is a culture that tolerates this and in too many ways promotes it. as tom mentioned we have an unprecedented partnership not just between our agencies but agencies across the federal government that the president has convened to bring our best resources and minds to bear to do something about it. there is now a web site, stopbullying.gov where a tool kit is being developed and these kinds of best practices are being promo
disputes, war, religion and speaking more than one language. this book is my most personal book. my books of the most practical value to our daily lives, and as a shameless author i hope they can be my best purchase book. it's about what i've learned about spending a lot of my time in traditional tribal societies over the past 50 years. and it's about what friends and other scholars have learned from other tribal societies around the world. all of us here are accustomed to living in big industrial societies, in permanent housing with governments to make decision, with writing and books and internet. where most people live past age 60, when we regulate and counter strangers just as i am encountering you this evening, and where most of our food is grown by older people, we forget that every one of those things a rosary recently in history. humans have constituted a separate line of biological evolution, about 6 million years. but all of the things i just mentioned didn't exist anywhere in the world 11,000 years ago. they rose only within the last 11,000 years, and some of them such as the i
's religion holds up under a tough scrutiny, including my own. that's for sure. and i mean, you can worship cows and suck on maple tree twigs if you want to go to heaven and that's fine. we should tolerate it. but the same deference should be shown to my religion, catholic church and the christianity, which is not really the case, bill. >> bill: you got seven. university of missouri got seven. but the wiccans and pagans got eight. now, gutfeld, i don't see anything wrong with this as long as the university is up front. this is a movement and there are wiccans and witches and they do what they do. this is america. i'm not outraged. >> i'm a class 3 warlock, which means i can turn people into frogs, see piers morgan. i think wiccans that i've met are extremely nice people, unlike some more extreme religions. they don't try to kill you. they don't fly plane noose buildings. they actually -- they don't get out on the street and preach at you. >> bill: that's right, i should have asked -- they got to have a few muslims on this calendar, too. i forgot to ask. let me see here. no. i don't have it.
's war on terror became a global war on tribal islam" professor akbar ahmed, is a class of religion? >> guest: it is more complex. the concept of the clash of civilizations and others a simplistic. a and more than 10 years after 9/11 we should be aware of the conflicts where america is involved. i find many conflicts are rooted in the clash already taking place before and 11 was centered government and the triumph of the community on the border between states. without local history or culture it is impossible to impose simplistic notions but someone did waziristan or yemen is aghast at a clash of civilizations and. 90% had no idea what 9/11 was zero or of some of did not been. would have to be careful how we are analyzing and i maintain there is a crisis already was united states involved in a local conflict. >> host: ambassador to bases u.s. attacking their own personal try for their government? >> guest: you raised the third factor, with united states, the tribes now of the central government with a triangle of conflict that is the conflict said is often overlooked. would you incl
given to sexual orientation, race, religion, age, sex, marital status. it is time for the general assembly to act. >> it is long overdue. we should not allow discrimination. >> according to the capital, they are heading to the general assembly. >> a new report names maryland as one of the area's most vulnerable to sequestration cuts. maryland, virginia, and washington could feel the most pain from the cuts set to take place march 1 unless congress can reach a deal. unfortunately, there is not much movement toward a bipartisan deal to prevent a spending cuts. washington lawmakers are in recess. congress will return on monday, leaving them just days to agree to an alternative plan, which strategists saying lawmakers are working towards a deal even while they are away. >> if you or a parent or loved one receives social security benefits, changes are coming. the government is limiting its paper checks. social security benefits will only get payments through direct deposit or through a direct debit card now accounts. they are strongly urging them to get their money through direct depos
religion, but particularly islam, there's not always a clear understanding to what the first amendment guarantees, which is the right to teach about a religion but not proselytize about it. i think there's fear of associating with anyone associated with islam. there are events outside our control that creates more interest and unfortunately also makes people more afraid. one of the programs we are about to launch is putting all our content online so a teacher in north dakota where there are no muslim, potentially, no expert can come to her classroom, they can go to our web site and download the content and teach the things we are teaching. >> i think partnerships are the best way to overcome the limitations because we all have limitations. and sometimes it's just visibility. we actually have on our web site 50 short films and one of them is a muslim student from a school in fremont going to a school in arinda talking about what it's like going to school as a muslim in the united states and they are asking questions and you see we are all kids in school and we have more similaritie
defend today has been common to religions across time in many cultures and so we was don't want to ask the question of what common feature was motivating theology is rather than the other way round and it's not an argument from tradition. i'm not arguing because it's been this way it always should be. another thing is my argument can't be answered by appeals to the quality. we usually think that is the right response when we think of the marriage debate as a debate about whether to expand or restrict the pool of people eligible to marry. it is true about fake marriage is a good income should be available on an equal basis and you get right to same-sex marriage from there. i think this debate is about a prior question. it's a debate about what marriage is and why the state is involved in the first place, which of course has implication for which unions get recognized as marriages. my proposal is the main mission of marriage and support for same-sex marriage is mistaken and a strong about what marriage is. another is he can't explain much less controversial features that we all agree tha
have the opportunity to make choices for their own lives, whether it's a religion that want to believe and know what they want to do with their bodies. [applause] >> hi, my name is emily from indianapolis. and this past semester in my political science class island a little bit about the complications of voting with or against your party. but for libertarian what kind of dynamic does that play for you? >> well, i am a republican, as you well know. well, i personally believe the republican party is still the best vehicle to bring liberty into the political system. and know that there will be a lot of disagreement in this room up that, but that is my opinion. [applause] and i have always been a proud republican. i think that the republican party can be brought back to the principles of liberty. when you looked at my voting record, though more often with the republicans than i do the democrats. i do have one of the most independent voting records in congress. it is really not hard to do. yet to go out there and press the right button when the vote. [applause] >> greetings. you do somethin
not mean this to be in any way disrespectful toward religion-- but is it like a political convention? do you have people getting together feeling each other out? because one of you is going to be elected to this job. what's it like inside one of those conclaves? >> well, before the conclave actually start, there are a number of days when all the cardinals come together so that we can actually talk among ourselves, begin to get a better sense of one another. there are going to be 117 of us there with the right to vote. and just to get to know a little bit better personally one another, there will be four or five days of these meetings. but it-- >> schieffer: will you in any way-- could you be the nominee? >> no, that-- that enters into the world of fantasy. but when we get back into the real world, i think what will happen is a number of cardinals will begin to surface in the conversation among all of us as particularly appealing candidates. it's not like a political process, though. there aren't nominations, and you don't have people saying, "i vote for..." and "my favorite son is..." wh
. but we have to repackage them. >> reporter: and he repackages religion in a very unusual way. he's also a professional rapper, and preaches religion with rhyme. >> sometimes you have to do a little hip-hop, too. >> reporter: during a sermon? >> if need me. ♪ i'm trying to live it like christ ♪ >> reporter: as a rapper around the chicago area, the reverend is known as jay quest. >> what it really does is hopefully lead people into a greater understanding and awareness of themselves and their god. >> reporter: he's been preaching for ten years, he's been rapping professionally for about five years. they don't seem like they go together. but apparently they do. >> i don't think that i rap religion, though. i think that i rap about life, and i rap about the narratives of all of our experiences. i think that's the same thing that sermons are about. >> reporter: sermons and rap, the two have met. frank mathy, abc 7 news. >> whatever it takes. >> whatever gets the message out there is a good thing. so different people respond to different things. i like it. >> especially if you want to get
the campaign cling to their guns and religion. >> oddly enough opposite of 40 years ago. you listen to richard nixon on secret tapes he's saying things i'm for gun control and the way i will do it, scare all of the white voters about the black panthers. chris: and it worked. safe streets act. >> i think there's a mismatch with how people actually live and how people actually want to think about the country. if you look at the border for instance, look at brooklyn and what happened during hurricane sandy, there wasn't any rash of looting and rash of stealing. i don't know if this is going to work. wayne lapierre. chris: i have not seen a republican stand up and say i disagree with wayne lapierre in the media. >> there are two issues here. we will not get a sweeping gun control bill because politics are such we're not. but the question of can wayne lapierre help republicans build a big collision across issues. there i agree with mia i don't that i will happen. i think that's older america. really -- chris: you're smart but could it be short road strategy? everyone know there's a small window bec
and everyday we know that the epidemic of violent vls knows no raise carried or religion but we also know that there are absolutely objective risk forks that we can pass on and that is the hope and action of wrap around we work to reduce those risk factors associated with violent injury and community partners and by doing so we give young people the opportunity to live if become heros and by reducing the injury resid diskism these case manager that is i have to have on stage with me because they are so much everything to me ... (applause) they work they work everyday to make my night job observe sleet and i would love to see that day. i want to first thank these case managers and haive judiciary and ruben and michael you are the heros full of home, determination and inspiration i'm so proud of what you have done and i thank you for absolutely being my brothers in this cause. i couldn't say enough (applause) . >> to our compliant rep.s our cline in the back of the room, joe drakely please stand up and let us give you a hand. thank you for trusting us in your journey to a rich life and
orientation, race, culture, religion, class, and every part of ones self that people bring to our organization and community so we have several programs that i will mention briefly, and i forgot we actually have a powerpoint so maybe i will turn to that for a moment. will that come up on the screen? >> yes they will bring it up. >> there it is. thank you. so we have a picture here of the regtively new logo on top. for folks that can't see it -- how do i describe the logo? it's a black wheel with red inside and the mix of colors and energy and we have action in italics because that's the focus, and so the picture we have below is an action we did just this wednesday with the valentine a day eve action. this is the health care action team or hat so they have a yellow hard hats to go along with the action team and we see a group of people on the steps of city hall and what they're doing is practicing singing. we had several songs about how important it is for people with disabilities and seniors to have a home in san francisco, and that means having housing and health care and home care, a
could be a religion, you'd get more out of westerns than any other genre. (narrator) the western has come to symbolize american cinema, its images instantly recognizable the world over. many of our foremost directors, writers and actors have been drawn to its elemental moral themes and epic scale; its frontier characters -- fools, charlatans, outlaws and heroes -- confronting the grand themes of life and death on stage, the stark background of america's west. it's a western because of the story form, because of the traditional and conventional aspects of it. isolation. one man up against it, resolving it by violence... (john sturges) nobody can help him. they're good versus evil truth, or morality tales. (gunfire) (elmore leonard) i thought westerns would be easier to write. you're writing about a time the reader hasn't experienced. places that the reader hasn't been. you make up a town, a one-street town, with the board-front buildings down both sides. perhaps a board sidewalk; and that was easy to describe. there's something about the attire. (elmore leonard) the six-guns worn outs
religion?" and that had me thinking. turning this around. ice and i am a cologne. clone. i am a clone of the white man. you can call me whatever you like to call me. i do not know nothing else to be but hooah i am. and he said that is how we deal with you. tavis: you have gone to meddlin now. that is what my grandmother would say. i want to turn this conversation into being a clone of a white man, and you are going to come back another day, and we are going to talk about just that subject matter. it is important. this is black history month, so there is no better time. but i digress. that is a very deep point that i want to merit it on myself. i do want to come back to this point of you being a veteran, because you are a veteran. >> right. tavis: and you became a veteran after you were a star already. "lawdy miss clawdy" song was already out. you were on the charts, and you ended up being drafted. >> that is right. tavis: so you went to fight. >> why they took me, before i went in, no family was entitled to have more than four men from the same family. tavis: right. >> at that time i
boetticher) and it's very romantic. if movies could be a religion, you'd get more out of westerns than any other genre. (narrator) the western has come to symbolize american cinema, its images instantly recognizable the world over. many of our foremost directors, writers and actors have been drawn to its elemental moral themes and epic scale; its frontier characters -- fools, charlatans, outlaws and heroes -- confronting the grand themes of life and death on stage, the stark background of america's west. it's a western because of the story form, because of the traditional and conventional aspects of it. isolation. one man up against it, resolving it by violence... (john sturges) nobody can help him. they're good versus evil truth, or morality tales. (gunfire) (elmore leonard) i thought westerns would be easier to write. you're writing about a time the reader hasn't experienced. places that the reader hasn't been. you make up a town, a one-street town, with the board-front buildings down both sides. perhaps a board sidewalk; and that was easy to describe. there's something about the attire.
backgrounds, cultures, races, religions and sexual orientations and additional, recruits and maintains faculty and staff from the same broad range of backgrounds. to achieve these goals town provides scholarships to approximately 20% of the students and act i don't havely solicits a diverse student body. so here is a little bit about the short-term lease terms. we're looking as a mentioned before a term of july through -- pardon me august of this year through july of 2013. they do have the option to extend through september of 2014, with the department consent. and to show you how serious we are that this is a short-term lease the department and town have agreed to a $10,000 per day penalty for any day they would be in the space beyond their lease expiration date. and again, they are permitted to use the space for the operation of their k-8 school and they will also be maintaining and keeping open to the public the bathrooms in the lobby area that have been open to the public through the use of the exploratorium. we have negotiated a monthly rent of $42,000 a month, which is comparable to wha
of fellow muslims. are they killing us, she cries? we share the same religion, what did we do? why have the culprits not been punished? those responsible for this devastation were suny extremists. was their second major attack in the past six weeks. is now undermunity siege, calling out for protection and for justice. she'll leaders claimed the killers who were nurtured by the top -- she'll leaders claimed the killers still have powerful friends. -- shia leaders claimed the killer is still have powerful friends. we believe there are some elements in our law enforcement who were supporting them, who are protecting them. >> as the latest victims were laid to rest, the government finally took some action. suspects were rounded up and a few senior militants were killed. shias wonder why it took so long and how many more bodies they will have to bury. "bbc worldwatching is america." --tro's mention of the world word retire has people talking. celebrated piece of work by the british street artist is now on the other side of the world. we report on the controversy that it has sparked. >> it is
on religion, on secularism, on every small detail you can think of. unfortunately, things will get worse. >> the latest amendment is just another ploy by the government to destroy his party, says. but the government says it's looking for justice for terrible cres committed just over 40 years ago. there's no unity and no agreement here. it seems that bangladesh still has some way to go before it can put to rest its painful past. wille airplane in spain stay on the ground the next five days. begun a fivef have day strike in protest against job and salary cuts. action preceptor ground more than 1000 flights in spain this week? . it is expected to cost the airline millions of dollars. workers including baggage handlers, pilots, and cabin crews say they will hold off three separate strikes until march. iberia said the layoffs are necessary to cut costs. now more from madrid. is the future, more robots and automatic check-in desks, fewer people with real jobs. this area would be much busier than it is now. the first friday strike has led to the cancellation of 416 flights. over one of thousand
the church. >> it is drowning out the voice of religion. >> cardinal worrl thinks it is unlikely the next pope will be an american. >>> a look at this morning's health news. there are two studies out in the journal journal of pediatrics. they give parents some guidance on what kids should watch on tv. one found kids who watch tv excessively are more likely to exhibit antisocial and even criminal behavior in early adulthood. it increased 30% with every hour children watch tv. children should watch no more of two hours of quality programming each day. the second study showed aggressive content leads to aggressive children. the kids in the study were three to five years old. they all watched the same amount of television. the only change was the type of programming. the children who watched the better quality, educational programming were significantly less aggressive than the other group. >>> when we hear all the talks about federal cuts and sequestration there are a few of us preparing for furlough and his cutbacks and another group of us think it has nothing to do with them. coming up at
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 188 (some duplicates have been removed)